A Distributed Protocol to Serve Dynamic Groups For Peer-to-Peer Streaming

Peer-to-peer (P2P) streaming has been widely deployed over the Internet. A streaming system usually has multiple channels, and peers may form multiple groups for content distribution. In this paper, we propose a distributed overlay framework (called SMesh) for dynamic groups where users may frequently hop from one group to another while the total pool of users remain stable. SMesh first builds a relatively stable mesh consisting of all hosts for control messaging.

The mesh supports dynamic host joining and leaving, and will guide the construction of delivery trees. Using the Delaunay Triangulation (DT) protocol as an example, we show how to construct an efficient mesh with low maintenance cost. We further study various tree construction mechanisms based on the mesh, including embedded, bypass, and intermediate trees. Through simulations on Internet-like topologies, we show that SMesh achieves low delay and low link stress.

Existing System:

Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks have been adopted for Internet live video-streaming service, and several practical systems have been deployed in past years due to the inherent scalability and ease of deployment. However, most of these systems are commercial and proprietary, and hence little research was done in the area of characterizing practical system performance properties.

In this article, we mainly present our experience on a practical P2P-based live video- streaming system called Grid Media, which was employed to broadcast live the Chinese Spring Festival Gala show over the Internet a trace study to understand the service capacity, quality of streaming service, connection heterogeneity, user geographic distribution, and request and online duration characteristics. Our observations shed light on those systems and further improvements in the arena of large-scale live video-streaming service over the Internet.

Proposed System:

Peer-to-peer (P2P) streaming has been widely deployed over the Internet. A streaming system usually has multiple channels, and peers may form multiple groups for content distribution. In this paper, we propose a distributed overlay framework (called SMesh) for dynamic groups where users may frequently hop from one group to another while the total pool of users remain stable. SMesh first builds a relatively stable mesh consisting of all hosts for control messaging.

The mesh supports dynamic host joining and leaving, and will guide the construction of delivery trees. With the penetration of broadband Internet access, there has been an increasing interest in media streaming services. Recently, P2P streaming has been proposed and developed to overcome the limitations of traditional server-based streaming. In a P2P streaming system, cooperative peers self-organize themselves into an overlay network via unicast connections. They cache and relay data for each other, thereby eliminating the need for resourceful servers from the system.

We can see that there is a large pool of peers in the streaming network. Peers are divided into multiple small groups, each corresponding to a channel. In the traditional DT protocol, each host knows its geographic coordinates. Hosts form a DT mesh based on their geographic coordinates. Compass routing, a kind of local routing, is then used to route a message along the mesh. In this approach, a host only needs to know the states of its immediate neighbors to construct and maintain the mesh, and the mesh is adaptive to dynamic host joining or leaving.

Modules:

  • Network Module

  • Dynamic Randomization Group

  • Peer-to-Peer Streaming

  • Delaunay Triangulation (dt)